Tag Archives: Calycanthus

Today’s Walk Around The Estate….

….produced a couple of lovely surprises!

The yucca in our front garden is older than our occupation. It was well established when we arrived over 25 years ago and has dictated how we laid out our front garden. There was no way we could face removing it – even if we had wanted to! Far too ferocious!

I was aware there were several flower spikes emerging – nothing unusual in that – but, coming home today, I noticed a few more red buds appearing. I took a spike count – NINE in total!

That’s our record!

My next pleasant surprise was our hop. Originally I propagated it from a wild hop, to add to our very first herb garden. It used to try to scale the ash tree, which we’ve recently had to remove, but then was little more than a sapling. It has somewhat lost a lot of its vigour without its climbing pole, and instead spreads out, determined to trip us up. It’s another plant that would be nigh on impossible to remove, with its strong root system embedded within the roots of the old ash trunk! So I’ve let it do its thing, just cutting out its “trip wires”. I just draped one of these treacherous shoots, over our potted calycanthus, out of the way. I didn’t realise how nicely it would perform, once it flowered. And a totally unexpected effect!

Gardening isn’t always hard work!

Advertisements

Scent in the Garden – July

Clockwise from top left -  Sweet pea; Buddleia; Jasminum officinalis; Jasminum beesianum

Clockwise from top left –
Sweet pea; Buddleia; Jasminum officinalis; Jasminum beesianum

The baton that June laid down, has been most definitely picked up by July, and is now off and running.

The July scented garden has all the usual suspects – roses, honeysuckles, sweet peas, lavender, pinks and Jasmine. The camera has gone into overtime and the volume of photos now, necessitates the use of montages, to display them all!

Some of our roses, missed the bus in June, and have now caught the next one.

Clockwise from top left -  Rosa eglanteria; Rosa gallica officinalis; Rose "Silver Anniversary"; Rosa "Albertine"

Clockwise from top left –
Rosa eglanteria; Rosa gallica officinalis; Rose “Silver Anniversary”; Rosa “Albertine”

But I still maintain, that Philadelphus most definitely give roses a run for their money when it comes to perfume. We have two – the giant, clumsy mock orange, rescued from a supermarket shelf, claiming to be “Virginal”, and the smaller, more delicate, “Sybille”. Of the two, “Sybille” has the better perfume, and its bubblegum scent carries all around the garden.

Top- Philadelphus "Sybille" Bottom - Philadelphus "Virginal"

Top- Philadelphus “Sybille”
Bottom – Philadelphus “Virginal”

For scent in the garden, nothing can beat lavender. It shouts the Mediterranean – even though L. angustifolia is English lavender! I love it! I grow it wherever I can, in pots, as well as in the borders. In common with other aromatic herbs, it gives us perfume all year round from its leaves – the flowers are a bonus! This lavender, “Hidcote” with its dark purple flowers, looks particularly good alongside the yellow froth of Alchemilla Mollis.

image

Other aromatic herbs are adding to their appeal by starting to give us flowers, as well.

image

Our Honeysuckle “Belgica” is still going great guns, and has been joined with a few pals ….

Top- Lonicera "Belgica" Bottom L. - Lonicera delavayii ; R. - Honeysuckle from next door

Top- Lonicera “Belgica”
Bottom L. – Lonicera delavayii ; R. – Honeysuckle from next door

My potted pinks are giving me particular pleasure on the patio.

image

I do have a few other more unusual gems, though.

Top - Zenobia pulverulenta "Blue Skies" Bottom L. - Escallonia Iveyi; R. - Calycanthus floridus

Top – Zenobia pulverulenta “Blue Skies”
Bottom L. – Escallonia Iveyi; R. – Calycanthus floridus

More on those another time!

Now, I must show you an idea I “borrowed” from the local pub!

image

They had pots of herbs and flowers in a small trough on a table in the garden. It got me thinking of a line of troughs along our outdoor dining table containing scented flowers, and herbs for picking and adding to food. What do you think? Add some jars for tea lights, a pot of “touchy-feely” chamomile and our recently acquired Kaffir lime, and that’s a lovely table centre piece.

July’s scent, though, has not been restricted to the garden.
Some of it found its way indoors.

image

How’s your garden smelling?