Wordless Wednesday – I Saw It Through The Grapevine!

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What a Perfumed Paradise !

Yes

It’s been a while since I blogged, and it’s well overdue for a catch up.

No major changes have happened recently in the garden. It’s now becoming well established, with maintenance and tweaking the order of the day. Humdrum stuff really!

But at the height of summer, with everything blooming and smelling divine, I just had to share!

I love hydrangea “Annabelle ” at this time of year, just as the flower heads change from lime green to pure white.

And, as always, when June moves into July, we have the battle for perfume champion.

It’s always the roses…

…. versus the philadelphus.

Mind you, there are other contenders, too.

Jasmine….

….and our “borrowed” honeysuckle!

I’m afraid the jury’s still out!

Chloris http://thebloominggarden.wordpress.com/ has been asking which new scented plants, I’ve purchased in the meantime. Not so many, I’m afraid! I’m having to be more disciplined as space is becoming limited. I’ve bought Cistus purpurea to add to the Cottage border, to replace a failing rose, (which has now sprung back into life in a pot – typical!) and a Calycanthus “Venus” for the same reason! (But that’s for another time!)

Of course, there’s also the impulse buy from Malvern show, Rhaphiolepsis umbellata, which is still languishing in its pot, while I ponder where to put it. Must get this one right first time – it won’t tolerate being moved.

And my most recent purchase is – surprise, surprise – not scented! It was bought at the local carnival this weekend and was not an impulse buy. It was one that was premeditated for adding to my collection of blue glazed foliage pots, a dark leaved Phormium, to set off the other surrounding dark planting. (Sadly, with no label!)

I’ve also experimented with seasonal pots, using night scented phlox (easier than Zaluzianskya ovata!) as the main ingredient, which I’ve grown from seed. This is the first time in many years I’ve dabbled in this aspect of the garden. I’ve planted up two large pots and used them alongside complementary summer bedding.

The first is a large, metallic planter where I’ve picked up on the white flowers of the phlox backed with purple, and paired it with a scented Petunia (of course!), one whose perfume takes me back to summer holidays.

The other is in a brown and white glazed pot, where I chose a white begonia with the darkest, chocolate brown leaves I could find, to plant with the phlox, to match the planter.

The rest of the phlox plants I grew have been planted in a couple of containers on their own. As yet, the phlox is yet to flower, though it’s not far off. You can just see them starting to open in the brown pot.

Elsewhere in the garden, the Grass garden was really in need of an overhaul, due to some plants, including, I’m afraid to say, weeds, taking over. It’s now settling in and performing well.

So that’s a round up of our main developments!

And it’s good to be getting back into the swing again! So will see you again soon!

The Last of the Summer Produce

 

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It’s been a productive and “fruitful” year in the Allotment.

We’ve had kale, onions and chillis all the colours of the rainbow.

We’ve had chocolate coloured cherry tomatoes, and tomatillos galore, that make the most wonderful salsa.

And the wonkiest of (not so) multicoloured carrots!

The “Scrumptious ” apples are stored in the shed, and what remains of the uneaten “Doyenne du Comice” pears have been spiced and pickled.

And these are the last pickings….

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….oh, well!

Size isn’t everything!

One very small moussaka is on the way!

Today’s Walk Around The Estate….

….produced a couple of lovely surprises!

The yucca in our front garden is older than our occupation. It was well established when we arrived over 25 years ago and has dictated how we laid out our front garden. There was no way we could face removing it – even if we had wanted to! Far too ferocious!

I was aware there were several flower spikes emerging – nothing unusual in that – but, coming home today, I noticed a few more red buds appearing. I took a spike count – NINE in total!

That’s our record!

My next pleasant surprise was our hop. Originally I propagated it from a wild hop, to add to our very first herb garden. It used to try to scale the ash tree, which we’ve recently had to remove, but then was little more than a sapling. It has somewhat lost a lot of its vigour without its climbing pole, and instead spreads out, determined to trip us up. It’s another plant that would be nigh on impossible to remove, with its strong root system embedded within the roots of the old ash trunk! So I’ve let it do its thing, just cutting out its “trip wires”. I just draped one of these treacherous shoots, over our potted calycanthus, out of the way. I didn’t realise how nicely it would perform, once it flowered. And a totally unexpected effect!

Gardening isn’t always hard work!